Let go of that lawn to welcome some life into your suburban yards

Here is a neat video illustrating how wonderful it can be to convert our yards into ecosystems rich in biodiversity – richer certainly than the manicured lawns that dominate most suburban landscapes. Imagine converting most of that lawn acreage – estimated to be 4x the acreage of corn making lawns the number one irrigated crop in the continental US – into native wildlife-friendly habitats!

Imagine your yard looking and sounding and smelling and feeling like this:

How much more local biodiversity would we be able to support within our increasingly suburban landscape? How many ecosystem services and positive environmental externalities could our suburbs generate? By supporting healthier populations of honeybees, for example, which might go pollinate crops in the surrounding agricultural landscape, and maybe give you some delicious local honey to boot, especially if we give them more beautiful flowers from which to sip! That’s a joy already being experienced by urban apiarists even in megacities, who would no doubt appreciate more flowers for their hardworking bees.

And how much water would we save, especially out here in the arid southwest? After all, water wise yards are also biodiversity friendly yards, which is why we are trying to promote them in the suburban sprawl of California’s Central Valley.

It is high time you let go of that lawn, and welcome some more life into your yards too.

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About aranyak

I am an associate professor of vertebrate ecology at California State University, Fresno.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Let go of that lawn to welcome some life into your suburban yards

  1. mandnjill says:

    I loved your video. I’m a broken (ill) conservation worker and wildlife filmmaker in the making. I’m trying to start a wildlife initiative for local gardens in Orchard Park, Cambridge, UK. I’d love to be able to make a similar “before the project-after the project” video showing an increase in biodiversity.

  2. Pingback: What a difference wildlife gardening can make | opwildlife

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